Written Plagiarism – Exhibit 20: Amanda gives advice on how to be a Professional Speaker (Phil Cooke)

On 22/05/2012 Amanda Wells plagiarizes material from Phil Cooke – 04/05/2011

Below is another work that has been plagiarised. Wells was exposed in 2015 as being the “Culprit in the Pulpit” by churchwatch central. It is difficult to comprehend why her ministry is condoned and encouraged.

NOTICE THAT AMANDA WELLS IS INSERTING HERSELF INTO SOMEONE ELSE’S MEMORY! IN THIS CASE IT’S PHIL COOKE’S. 


In this exhibit, you will read Article 1 and Article 2.

Article 1 will be an article Amanda Wells has published as her own on Amanda Wells Coaching/Amanda Wells Ministries.

Article 2 will be the original article from which she plagiarised. The parts she plagiarised will be highlighted in red.

Weeding Out Amanda Wells logo
Watch Article 1 of Amanda Wells plagiarising Article 2 and read along.


Article 1

Amanda Wells “writes” on her FaceBook ‘Amanda Wells’ account,

WANT TO BE A PROFESSIONAL SPEAKER? STICK TO THE TIME LIMIT!

When I’m speaking to a conference, I hate to get scheduled behind time hogs.

I remember being the keynote speaker at a big Women’s Conference a few years ago and the woman ahead of me was an icebreaker…… she was a comedian of sorts, trouble was her 10min spiel went for 45 mins and now as I am going up on the platform I am told my 45 mins has now dropped to 15mins!! It’s not a matter of me being a great speaker. It’s simply a matter of courtesy. Another time the assistant pastor did the announcements 40 mins and when I got up I had 8 mins for a message I was told…….. why invite me!! A great one is the person who asks to give a testimony and have a 7 point message and there you are the guest speaker with a fake smile taped to your face, waiting!!! Each of us plan our talks based on the time limits of the program, and to exceed yours at the expense of other people is incredibly inconsiderate. Not to mention the conference host got ripped off because he’d paid for to fly the guest across country to probably be the keynote speaker, and now they are forced to cut their session short.

Pastors may be the worst time offenders, because they do the vast majority of speaking on their home turf, and control the playing field. So they don’t develop the discipline of speaking to a certain time. Conference organisers hate it, because it throws off the rest of the schedule. The problem is that too many people start to speak, and think the audience is really loving them and assume nobody minds if they run over.

Wrong.

First – learn to read the room. Trust me, in most cases, the audience isn’t loving you as much as you think. I know from experience. Learn to read the temperature of the audience and leave them at a high point – not with them wishing you would leave. A famous opera singer said you should stop singing before the audience has stopped listening. Good rule.

Second – practice at home….

Source: Amanda Wells Coaching, Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/Amanda-Wells-139859566029369/?fref=ts, Published 22/05/2012 (Accessed 11/29/2016.)

THIS BELOW SCREEN SHOT WAS TAKEN TODAY ON NOVEMBER 29, 2016

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_______________________________________________________________________

Article 2

(Red notes material that was plagiarized by Wells from this work)

Phil Cooke wrote:

Want to Be a Professional Speaker? Stick to the Time Limit!

Secret:  When I’m speaking to a conference, I hate to get scheduled behind time hogs. I spoke at a conference last year and a local leader was scheduled to do a 15-20 minute introduction to the conference. I was scheduled to do the keynote talk for 45 minutes right after him.  The problem was he ran on for 45+ minutes himself, cutting my time down to 30.  Because he couldn’t discipline himself as a speaker, he forced me to cut my talk by 1/3 on the fly.  It’s not a matter of me being a great speaker.  It’s simply a matter of courtesy.  Each of us plan our talks based on the time limits of the program, and to exceed yours at the expense of other people is incredibly inconsiderate.  Not to mention the conference host got ripped off because he’d paid for me to fly across country to be the keynote speaker, but I was forced to cut that short.

Pastors may be the worst time offenders, because they do the vast majority of speaking on their home turf, and control the playing field. So they don’t develop the discipline of speaking to a certain time.  Conference organizers hate it, because it throws off the rest of the schedule.  The problem is that too many people start to speak, and think the audience is really digging them and assume nobody minds if they run over.

Wrong.

First – learn to read the room. Trust me, in most cases, the audience isn’t digging you as much as you think.  I know from experience.  Learn to read the temperature of the audience and leave them at a high point – not with them wishing you would leave.  A famous opera singer said you should stop singing before the audience has stopped listening.  Good rule.

Second – practice at home. Hitting a time limit is a learned skill.  Don’t wing it and expect to hit the target – ever.

Third – Respect the other speakers! They have something important to share, and you’re taking that away from the audience.

Finally – If you really want to be invited back, learn to respect the schedule. No matter what the time limit, you should be able to nail it.  Even if it’s only scheduled for 10  minutes, if you can’t bring something compelling at that length, then don’t get up at all.

Reference: Written by Phil Cooke on Betrayal, http://www.philcooke.com/want-to-be-a-professional-speaker-stick-to-the-time-limit/, Published 4th May, 2012.

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